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David Ogilvy's Timeless Rules for Advertising and Marketing

thesuccessmanual on 26/03/10 city: New-York tags: remarkable quotes mba  Comment: 0 Save: 0

This guide belongs to 100 Ways To Be Being Remarkable Series, a special project that brings you business and self-development advice from The Success Manual.

Often called “The Father of Advertising” In 1975, Time called David Ogilvy “the most sought-after wizard in the advertising industry.”

At 60 miles an hour the loudest noise in this Rolls-Royce comes from the electric clock." 1958
- Source: Rolls-Royce print ad

[This is sometimes referred to as the most famous headline in advertising history.]

I notice increasing reluctance on the part of marketing executives to use judgment; they are coming to rely too much on research, and they use it as a drunkard uses a lamp post for support, rather than for illumination.

A good advertisement is one which sells the product without drawing attention to itself.

A well-run restaurant is like a winning baseball team. It makes the most of every crew member's talent and takes advantage of every split-second opportunity to speed up service.

Advertising is only evil when it advertises evil things.

What really decides consumers to buy or not to buy is the content of your advertising, not its form.

What you say in advertising is more important than how you say it.

You have only 30 seconds in a TV commercial. If you grab attention in the first frame with a visual surprise, you stand a better chance of holding the viewer. People screen out a lot of commercials because they open with something dull... When you advertise fire-extinguishers, open with the fire.

You make the best products you can, and you grow as fast as you deserve to.

You now have to decide what 'image' you want for your brand. Image means personality. Products, like people, have personalities, and they can make or break them in the market place.

There is no need for advertisements to look like advertisements. If you make them look like editorial pages, you will attract about 50 per cent more readers.

The more informative your advertising, the more persuasive it will be.

The most important word in the vocabulary of advertising is TEST. If you pretest your product with consumers, and pretest your advertising, you will do well in the marketplace.

The headline is the 'ticket on the meat.' Use it to flag down readers who are prospects for the kind of product you are advertising.

The advertisers who believe in the selling power of jingles have never had to sell anything.

Political advertising ought to be stopped. It's the only really dishonest kind of advertising that's left. It's totally dishonest.

Never write an advertisement which you wouldn't want your family to read. You wouldn't tell lies to your own wife. Don't tell them to mine.

In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker unless you can also sell what you create.

I don't know the rules of grammar... If you're trying to persuade people to do something, or buy something, it seems to me you should use their language, the language they use every day, the language in which they think. We try to write in the vernacular.

I have a theory that the best ads come from personal experience. Some of the good ones I have done have really come out of the real experience of my life, and somehow this has come over as true and valid and persuasive.

Every advertisement should be thought of as a contribution to the complex symbol which is the brand image.

I once used the word "obsolete" in a headline, only to discover that 43% of housewives had no idea what it meant. In another headline I used the word "ineffable," only to discover that I didn't know what it meant myself.

Committees can criticize advertisements, but they should never be allowed to create them.

Also read:

Peter Drucker's Rules of Management

The Best wisdom of Tom Peters

The Best of Seth Godin

The Best of Guy Kawasaki


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